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Mark Webber created this Ning Network.

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Events

Latest Activity

Fred Labs left a comment for Colton Kisling
"Gave you my typical welcome comment even though you have been in the chat room already. :)"
yesterday
Fred Labs left a comment for Colton Kisling
"Welcome Colton! Be sure to join us in the chat room during the radio show on Saturday mornings (6am-9am on WHIO 1290AM 95.7FM). Sign in at http://gardentalkblog.com/ . When the Main Room pops up (if it doesn't pop up, just click on it at the…"
yesterday
Fred Labs left a comment for Linda Wendling
"What particular question would you like to ask?"
yesterday
Fred Labs left a comment for Linda Wendling
"Welcome Linda! Be sure to join us in the chat room during the radio show on Saturday mornings (6am-9am on WHIO 1290AM 95.7FM). Sign in at http://gardentalkblog.com/ . When the Main Room pops up (if it doesn't pop up, just click on it at the…"
yesterday
Linda Wendling is now a member of Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog
Tuesday
Colton Kisling is now a member of Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog
Saturday
Fred Labs left a comment for Sydney Barnard
"Welcome Sydney! Be sure to join us in the chat room during the radio show on Saturday mornings (6am-9am on WHIO 1290AM 95.7FM). Sign in at http://gardentalkblog.com/ . When the Main Room pops up (if it doesn't pop up, just click on it at the…"
Saturday
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event

In the Garden Kitchen "Peaches" at AM1290,News 95.7FM, gardentalkblog.com, and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

June 25, 2016 all day
he peach (Prunus persica) is a deciduous tree native to the region of Northwest China between the Tarim Basin and the north slopes of the Kunlun Shan mountains, where it was first domesticated and cultivated. It bears an edible juicy fruit called a peach or a nectarine.The specific epithet persica refers to its widespread cultivation in Persia, whence it was transplanted to Europe. It belongs to the genus Prunus which includes the cherry, apricot, almond and plum, in the rose family. The peach is classified with the almond in the subgenus Amygdalus, distinguished from the other subgenera by the corrugated seed shell.Peach and nectarines are the same species, even though they are regarded commercially as different fruits. In contrast to peaches, whose fruits present the characteristic fuzz on the skin, nectarines are characterized by the absence of fruit-skin trichomes (fuzz-less fruit); genetic studies suggest nectarines are produced due to a recessive allele, whereas peaches are…See More
Saturday
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event
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In the Garden "Are Evergreens Evergreen?" at AM1290,News 95.7FM, gardentalkblog.com, and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

June 25, 2016 from 6:30am to 6:45am
So are Evergreen Plants really evergreen? Listen and learn about the how evergreen plants grow and learn if Evergreen Plants really evergreen?See More
Saturday
Mark Webber posted a blog post
Saturday
Mark Webber's blog post was featured
Saturday
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event
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Garden Talk "LIVE" on June 25,2016 at AM1290,News 95.7FM, gardentalkblog.com, and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

June 25, 2016 from 6am to 9am
Its June 25th 2016, the weather has been hot and then we get violent storms and plants seem to grow or maybe look not so good. So if your plants are struggling, or you got weeds and simply have questions call 457.1290.See More
Saturday
Mark Webber's discussion was featured

What Plant AM I? for June 6,2016

What Plant AM I?My genus of bushy, tuberous, herbaceous perennial plants native to Mexico. I am member of the Asteraceae (or Compositae), dicotyledonous plants, related species include the sunflower, daisy, chrysanthemum, and zinnia. There are 42 species of me, with hybrids commonly grown as garden plants. My flower forms are variable, with one head per stem; these can be as small as(2 in) diameter or up to (1 ft) ("dinner plate").My stems are leafy, ranging in height from as low as(12 in) to more than (6–8 ft). The majority of my species do not produce scented flowers or cultivars. My brightly colored flowers , displaying most hues, with the exception of blue.I am the national flower of a country. My tubers were grown as a food crop by the Aztecs, but this use largely died out after the Spanish Conquest. Attempts to introduce the tubers as a food crop in Europe were unsuccessful.Today the is still considered one of the native ingredients in Oaxacan cuisine; several cultivars are…See More
Saturday
Mark Webber posted a discussion

What Plant AM I? for June 6,2016

What Plant AM I?My genus of bushy, tuberous, herbaceous perennial plants native to Mexico. I am member of the Asteraceae (or Compositae), dicotyledonous plants, related species include the sunflower, daisy, chrysanthemum, and zinnia. There are 42 species of me, with hybrids commonly grown as garden plants. My flower forms are variable, with one head per stem; these can be as small as(2 in) diameter or up to (1 ft) ("dinner plate").My stems are leafy, ranging in height from as low as(12 in) to more than (6–8 ft). The majority of my species do not produce scented flowers or cultivars. My brightly colored flowers , displaying most hues, with the exception of blue.I am the national flower of a country. My tubers were grown as a food crop by the Aztecs, but this use largely died out after the Spanish Conquest. Attempts to introduce the tubers as a food crop in Europe were unsuccessful.Today the is still considered one of the native ingredients in Oaxacan cuisine; several cultivars are…See More
Saturday
Mark Webber posted events
Saturday
Mark Webber's 3 events were featured
Saturday
Richmond Pearson posted a blog post

PICK THE PERFECT PLANT - SOME BEST BETS FOR THE WETS

Gardeners are often willing to overlook the presence of undesirable and invasive plants in the landscape because those plants are successfully filling a niche and thriving in a difficult site. Wet sites, even overly moist sites, present challenges in large or small landscapes and often anything that will grow is preferable to losing multiple shrubs that just will not thrive in those conditions. Don't surrender! There are some great possibilities for just those conditions and two of my favorites are just starting to bloom now.Buttonbush, Cephalanthus occidentalis, is a native shrub growing throughout North America in full sun to light shade in wet locations from pond and stream banks to areas with prolonged periods of shallow standing water. The only sites where it will not thrive are those with very dry soil. It will grow 12 ft. or more tall and 4 ft - 8 ft. wide but tolerates pruning to manage its size. The shrub has a rather coarse, or bold texture in the landscape with stout stems…See More
Saturday
randy tischer posted a blog post

What "Fun" it is to grow turfgrass in Ohio in the Summer !!

Growing turfgrass in the hot, cool, wet , dry, humid, sunny , cloudy wonderful ever changing weather conditions here in Ohio can be lots of "Fun" !! Listed below you will find a short list of what we are seeing in lawns throughout Central and Southwest Ohio for the last week... 1. We are seeing Disease -- and lots of it ! Red Thread , Dollar Spot and Brown Patch in particular . While almost all turf diseases can be treated with fungicides, there may be times when the best thing too do is nothing at all ! Red Thread is normally a sign of low fertility levels. If you are not making 4-5 applications throughout the growing season of a well balanced turf fertilizer applied at the correct rate, doing so from now on may help prevent red thread in the future . We are seeing Brown Patch in Tall Fescue and dollar spot in Kentucky Bluegrass - something that is normal when our evening temperatures remain above 70 degrees and it is wet and humid outside.The easiest way to prevent turf diseases is…See More
Friday
Sydney Barnard posted a discussion

Wood eating pests

Hi Mark! I wonder if you could help me identify which pest did this. I don't think it is termites because I don't see their distinctive fecal pellets anywhere around the damage. There are small elongated black fecal pellets inside the damage and a lot of saw dust outside in a pile. I looked around inside the holes but there doesn't seem to be anyone home! Perhaps carpenter bees or beetles?Thanks!…See More
Jun 23
Sydney Barnard is now a member of Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog
Jun 23

Do your trees have indicators of Potential Failure?

If they do call Mark Webber at 937.835.3381

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Blog Posts

Herbicide Injured Tomatoes

Posted by Mark Webber on June 25, 2016 at 6:23am 0 Comments

EARWIGS

Posted by Mark Webber on June 11, 2016 at 7:53am 0 Comments

WATER, WATER, WATER

Posted by Richmond Pearson on June 11, 2016 at 5:30am 0 Comments

Mosquitoes

Posted by Mark Webber on June 4, 2016 at 8:05am 0 Comments

American Wisteria

Posted by Mark Webber on June 4, 2016 at 5:57am 0 Comments

I Need Rain!

Posted by Mark Webber on June 4, 2016 at 5:54am 0 Comments

Sawfly Slugged Rose Leaves

Posted by Mark Webber on June 4, 2016 at 5:53am 0 Comments

Willow Woes

Posted by Mark Webber on June 4, 2016 at 5:52am 0 Comments

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