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A place where garden talk listeners can get help about their lawn /tree and landscape issues! Plus share and give ideas to others!

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Get Ready for Spring! Landscape/Tree Inspection

             

          Get Ready for Spring! Landscape/Tree Inspection

Spring is just a few months away and now is the time to start planning on what you want your yard, garden, and landscape to look like in 2017! Save MONEY and time and get your property professional assessed by Dayton Ohio' Landscape & Tree Experts since 1997(Mark Webber's Landscaping Company)

For a limited time offer, you can have an International Society of Arboriculture Certified Arborist & Certified Landscape Technician meet with you and discuss your properties needs and we will perform a complete landscape inspection and review of your property for FREE ($195.00 Value) This free offer includes:


• 40-minute 1-on-1 personal consultation about your property at a time/date that works for your schedule and ours. (Weekends Available) ($50.00 Value)


• Soil test-soil sample collected and sent to the soil testing lab. ($95.00 value)


• Detail report outlining how to: fertilize/treat/prune/care/plant/improve your lawns property in 2017. ($50.00 value)

Conditions: Consultation must be signed up and scheduled to be completed by February 28,2017. Area of service for this free offer is a 50-mile radius of 8172 Hemple Road Dayton Ohio 45417

Call 937.835.3381 or sign up at FREE LANDSCAPE/TREE CONSULTATION

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Events

Latest Activity

Gary Kelley replied to Mike Feagle's discussion Tomatoes
"My favorite was sweet 100. I have not been able to find these for the last 2 or 3 years. They have been replaced with super sweet 100, too sweet almost to the point of nasty. I like more acid taste."
yesterday
Angela G replied to Mike Feagle's discussion Tomatoes
"For full flavor and ease of growing, we love the Tiny Tim cherry tomato that produces 1" fruits. Its petite size of only 12" height enable planting in a 6" pot if needed, though we grow several in a larger 20" pot. They are…"
yesterday
Mark Webber posted discussions
yesterday
Mark Webber's 2 discussions were featured
yesterday
Thomas A. Boss replied to Mike Feagle's discussion Tomatoes
"Our favorite tomato is Parks Whopper. We do a lot of canning and Whoppers have very little blemishes on them. They are a base Ball size tomato that ripens full red, taste is wonderful. We like to can them. Whole and diced. But we would not be…"
yesterday
Mark Webber posted a blog post

Bio-Char “The answer for soil problems”

The key to growing most plants is soils that contain, air, water, nutrients, microorganisms, macroorganisms and will drain excess wateraway. Many of the soils that exist in ourlandscapes are simple of poor condition due toconstruction practices from when our homeswere built.A 2,000-year-old practice of creating what is now called Biochar. Biochar is a process that converts agricultural waste into a soil enhancerthat can hold carbon, boost food security, andincrease soil biodiversity, and improve planthealth as well as growth. The process creates afine-grained, highly porous charcoal that helpssoils retain nutrients and water. Research statesthat use of Biochar will result in healthy plantsand some instances increase disease resistance. Soils applied with Biochar on the right.We strongly suggest that existing trees and planting undergo a soil test and a Biochar treatment in 2017.read more…See More
yesterday
Mark Webber's blog post was featured

Bio-Char “The answer for soil problems”

The key to growing most plants is soils that contain, air, water, nutrients, microorganisms, macroorganisms and will drain excess wateraway. Many of the soils that exist in ourlandscapes are simple of poor condition due toconstruction practices from when our homeswere built.A 2,000-year-old practice of creating what is now called Biochar. Biochar is a process that converts agricultural waste into a soil enhancerthat can hold carbon, boost food security, andincrease soil biodiversity, and improve planthealth as well as growth. The process creates afine-grained, highly porous charcoal that helpssoils retain nutrients and water. Research statesthat use of Biochar will result in healthy plantsand some instances increase disease resistance. Soils applied with Biochar on the right.We strongly suggest that existing trees and planting undergo a soil test and a Biochar treatment in 2017.read more…See More
yesterday
Richmond Pearson posted a blog post

JANUARY - IS IT STILL WINTER?

Temperatures in the Miami Valley have been erratic this month from below average to several days well above the average for this time of year. High winds, heavy rain and even thunderstorms have moved through. It is time to take a good look at the home landscape. Unseasonably warm temperatures are advancing many plants. On the west side of the house, I have Siberian Iris pushing new growth 3" - 4" tall already. Hardy mums that commonly keep a low tight crown of green are now 2" tall. Hydrangea buds are swelling and starting to break the outer protective bud scale. Some roses are pushing buds and the peach trees are showing rapidly swelling flower buds. there are a few things that can be done to protect some of these.Closely evaluate and monitor the landscape to be ready for protective action if needed. If a rapid temperature drop (to normal temperatures) is forecast, protective covering may be in order. Remember, plastic should not be used as it will transmit the cold directly to any…See More
yesterday
randy tischer posted a blog post

62 degrees on a saturday in January in Ohio ? Time to plant grass seed !

This weekend we will all enjoy temperatures in the mid 60 degree range ... IN OHIO of all places ! So what should every homeowner and landscape professional be doing this weekend? Making believe you are Johnny Appleseed and spreading Green Velvet Grass seed over all of those bare or worn spots in your lawn and landscape of course !If ever there was a time that you can just take a nice walk through your landscape and toss grass seed out onto your lawn without any soil preparation or hard work that has to be done in the normal growing season to properly plant your grass seed .. now is the time ! While it may feel like Spring outside in Ohio this weekend, Old Man Winter is not done with us yet! There is still lots of freezing temperatures, snow, ice and rain in the February forecast. It is this freezing and thawing that actually draws the grass seed down into the ground and "plants" the grass seed for you ! I recommend Winter dormant seedings where ever the lawn is thin or bare, and not…See More
Friday
Mike Feagle posted a discussion

Tomatoes

What is your favorite tomatoe variety and why?
Friday
Mike Feagle is now a member of Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog
Friday
Edith Newell posted a blog post

Trimming apple trees

Historically I have trimmed my two apple trees the first week in February. My neighbor indicated that the weather is too warm since we have had such an unusual winter. Is this true? Or, can I trim them when the temperature is in the mid to upper 40s?See More
Tuesday
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event
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In the Garden Kitchen "Cauliflower" at AM1290,News95.7FM,Gardentalkblog.com and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

January 14, 2017 from 6:45am to 7am
Cauliflower is one of the several vegetables in the species Brassica oleracea in the genus Brassica, which is in the family Brassicaceae. It is an annual plant that reproduces by seed. Typically, only the head (the white curd) is eaten. The cauliflower head is composed of a white inflorescence meristem. Cauliflower heads resemble those in broccoli, which differs in having flower buds. Brassica oleracea also includes broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, and kale, though they are of different cultivar groups.The oldest record of cauliflower dates back to the 6th century B.C.There are four major groups of cauliflower.Italian This specimen is diverse in appearance, biennial and annual in type. This group also includes white, Romanesco, various brown, green, purple, and yellow cultivars. This type is the ancestral form from which the others were derived. Northern European annualsUsed in Europe and North America for summer and fall harvest, it was developed in Germany in the…See More
Jan 14
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event
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In the Garden with Mark Webber "The time to learn" at AM1290,News95.7FM,Gardentalkblog.com and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

January 14, 2017 from 6:30am to 6:45am
As the winter season goes by the time for you to learn and broaden your horizons in the world of green. To grow anything you have to match:SoilLightHardinessBiological needsUltimate sizeother factorsUse these cold/wet/icy/ snowy days to have a greener tommorow.See More
Jan 14
Fred Labs is attending Mark Webber's event
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Gardentalk with Mark Webber "Live" for January 14th, 2017 at AM1290,News 95.7FM,gardentalkblog.com and worldwide on the iHeart Radio Network

January 14, 2017 from 6am to 9am
It is January 14th, 2017 and cold has left us for now, but the rain is trying to freeze. As the season changes the time nears for you to improve your yard, garden, and landscape. Get your gardening questions answered by calling 937.457.1290 on the AM1290, News 95.7FM, gardentalkblog.com and worldwide on the iHeart radio.See More
Jan 14
Mark Webber posted a blog post

Giant Sequoia ‘Tunnel Tree’ a Foreseeable Failure

It is all over the popular press the iconic tunnel tree has failed during weather event in California. Unfortunately, this tree's failure was a foreseeable failure due to the tree's root flare being violated years ago.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/09/us/pioneer-cabin-tree-sequoia.html?_r=0See More
Jan 14
Mark Webber's blog post was featured

Giant Sequoia ‘Tunnel Tree’ a Foreseeable Failure

It is all over the popular press the iconic tunnel tree has failed during weather event in California. Unfortunately, this tree's failure was a foreseeable failure due to the tree's root flare being violated years ago.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/09/us/pioneer-cabin-tree-sequoia.html?_r=0See More
Jan 14
Richmond Pearson posted a blog post

WINTER IN THE LANDSCAPE

Mid January in the Miami valley in Ohio should be marked by consistently lower temperatures, snow on the ground, and an increasing depth of frost in the soil. None of those are the case for 2017 so far. In less than one week temperatures have fluctuated from the single digits and teens to nearly 60 degrees. Heavy rains, while fortunately not the snow that could have been, have saturated soils that have yet to freeze. More seasonable, low temperatures are expected but will not likely persist. Time to check the landscape for any issues.The temperature pattern we have can cause some problems that can be easily solved if noticed and corrected in a timely manner. Look closely at recently planted material. Unfrozen, high moisture soils with the widely fluctuating temperatures we are having are the just right conditions for frost heaving. Check perennials that were planted last fall, both new installations as well as any that were divided and reset. Check shrubs and smaller trees as well,…See More
Jan 14
Mark Webber posted a discussion

What Plant AM I? for January 14th, 2017

What Plant AM I?I am found throughout all of Ohio, is usually found as an understory shrub of moist to wet woodlands that is one of the first shrubs to bloom, usually in late winter. If you scrape my twigs and branchlets, I emit a spicy fragrance.I have bright red fruits appear in late summer and early autumn on female shrubs, and are often quickly eaten by wildlife. I have dark green, glossy foliage, like that of Pawpaw, is unusual for woody plants that can thrive in full shade.I am a native of the Eastern United States. I can grow to 12 feet tall and 15 feet wide, when found under optimum conditions. I member of the Laurel Family, it is related to Sassafras.I am the favorite food plant of two lepidopterous insects. More so, my Tleaves, buds, and new growth twigs can be made into a tea.In fact, Native Americans, including the Cherokee, Creek, and Iroquois used me for treatments in multiple ailmentsSee More
Jan 14
Mark Webber's discussion was featured

What Plant AM I? for January 14th, 2017

What Plant AM I?I am found throughout all of Ohio, is usually found as an understory shrub of moist to wet woodlands that is one of the first shrubs to bloom, usually in late winter. If you scrape my twigs and branchlets, I emit a spicy fragrance.I have bright red fruits appear in late summer and early autumn on female shrubs, and are often quickly eaten by wildlife. I have dark green, glossy foliage, like that of Pawpaw, is unusual for woody plants that can thrive in full shade.I am a native of the Eastern United States. I can grow to 12 feet tall and 15 feet wide, when found under optimum conditions. I member of the Laurel Family, it is related to Sassafras.I am the favorite food plant of two lepidopterous insects. More so, my Tleaves, buds, and new growth twigs can be made into a tea.In fact, Native Americans, including the Cherokee, Creek, and Iroquois used me for treatments in multiple ailmentsSee More
Jan 14

Do your trees have indicators of Potential Failure?

If they do call Mark Webber at 937.835.3381

Gardening with Mark Webber Channel "Live USTREAM Channel"

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Blog Posts

JANUARY - IS IT STILL WINTER?

Posted by Richmond Pearson on January 21, 2017 at 5:56am 0 Comments

Winter Lawn Seeding Saturday

Posted by John m Scott on January 20, 2017 at 12:35pm 0 Comments

Trimming apple trees

Posted by Edith Newell on January 17, 2017 at 3:00pm 0 Comments

WINTER IN THE LANDSCAPE

Posted by Richmond Pearson on January 14, 2017 at 6:06am 0 Comments

WINTER WONDERLAND?

Posted by Richmond Pearson on January 7, 2017 at 5:52am 0 Comments

Some New Tomato Choices

Posted by John m Scott on January 6, 2017 at 1:02pm 0 Comments

GROWING INTO THE NEW YEAR

Posted by Richmond Pearson on December 31, 2016 at 5:30am 0 Comments

Goodby 2016 -- Hello 2017 !

Posted by randy tischer on December 30, 2016 at 1:30pm 0 Comments

Totipotent growth in trees

Posted by Mark Webber on December 3, 2016 at 7:53am 0 Comments

Turf tips for December !

Posted by randy tischer on December 2, 2016 at 4:00pm 0 Comments

The Poinsettia Story

Posted by John m Scott on December 2, 2016 at 3:37pm 0 Comments

YouTube

Learn how to select and use mulch at http://www.greenleafmulch.com/index.html

Inspiring Landscapes begin with GREAT Ideas!

                         
                          

 
 
 

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Forum

Tomatoes

Started by Mike Feagle in Sample Title. Last reply by Gary Kelley yesterday. 3 Replies

What Plant AM I? for January 7th 2017

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title. Last reply by Mark Webber Jan 7. 2 Replies

What Plant AM I?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title Dec 31, 2016. 0 Replies

New to landscaping.

Started by Lori Stall in Sample Title. Last reply by Fred Labs Oct 29, 2016. 2 Replies

What Plant AM I?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title Oct 29, 2016. 0 Replies

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