Garden Talk Blog Super Search Engine

Loading

This is the place I learned Plant Id at Ohio State Serious damage!!

Rating:
  • Currently 0/5 stars.

Views: 316

Comment

You need to be a member of Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog to add comments!

Join Mark Webber's Garden Talk Blog

Comment by Mark Webber on October 16, 2010 at 6:23am
Comment by Mark Webber on September 24, 2010 at 4:58pm
Comment by Mark Webber on September 22, 2010 at 9:45am
Monday Updates


1. Inventory of downed trees now up to 545 trees that are 6” in diameter or larger. Today did a 53” diameter sycamore, a 42” red oak, the trees from Crablandia I, and the Discovery Gardens west of the Rhododendron Valley. John Cardina, Bruce Cubberley, Denise Ellsworth, Cathy Herms and Bruce Cubberley involved in the inventory along with support from Ken Cochran and Dan Herms and Joe Cochran and many others. There was a ginkgo tree that literally stopped a silo from blowing across Secrest Road into a nearby business. Sycamore stems, though felled, of unparalleled beauty. The handle of a broom from the Gourley Hall greenhouses a half mile away at rest atop a Crablandia stump.

2. Wonderful lunch in the serene environs of the already cleaned-up and tranquil water garden area that Joe Cochran and others have cleared out. It was a fine day with floating island clouds and blue sky of unrivalled beauty. In the past week we have “looked at clouds from both sides now”.

3. It is still problematical to get on to campus: safety issues in buildings and dangerous greenhouses, insurance people on-site, heavy equipment, security issues, and the fact that Disaster administration supersede daily OARDC issues all, making entry a Police/Highway Patrol headache. Possible delay for opening of OARDC until next week.

4. Ken is working out plans to coordinate all the wonderful offers to help. As you can imagine, many want to come to see the Arboretum and to pitch in and help and to provide financial support for the rising of the new improved Arboretum. This shall come as the dust clears.

5. We are seeing more and more educational and research opportunities to learn about forest regeneration, invasive plant biology, the power of wind, new uses for newly cleared arboretum land, what happens with decay fungi on damaged trees, and on and on. Many educational programs will grow from this event. Stay tuned.

6. Sorry, but though I thought I had it figured out, I still am unable to send out images of what we are seeing at Secrest as we do our inventory of trees affected by the tornado. Everything I try takes too long to compress. I obviously know how to send a pic or two, but am trying to send a portfolio of about 50-60 pics for each day, and though “it is easy”, I cannot seem to do it, even with good help. Will keep trying.
Comment by Mark Webber on September 20, 2010 at 9:50am
Sunday Secrest Message

Friends: Here are a few updates this Sunday.

1. Bruce Cubberley, Cathy Herms, Laura Chatfield and Jim Chatfield have completed the data collection from the OARDC campus trees greater than 3 inches in diameter that were lost to the tornado. We did these campus trees first because more of these are now stumps due to the magnificent cleanup effort underway. Almost 200 trees, almost all over 10" in diameter. Some examples you will recognize are a 42" pin oak near Madison Avenue just north of the Admin building, the 2 Urban elms over 30" in diameter behind Gourley Hall, all the London planetrees in the Fisher parking lot, and many of the pin oaks in the lane leading to the Arboretum. To keep things in perspective, a single 24" pin oak tree in a Wooster, OH (44691 area code) parkland setting provides $214 in annual benefits (according to the USDA Forest Service i-Tree analysis which you can access easily on treebenefits.com).

2. Dan Herms was with Ken Cochran all afternoon Sunday as they thought of all the "new beginnings" for the Arboretum. They are developing all types of educational and research plans, from the rebuilding of the new teaching building - the Jack and Deb Miller Pavilion - in the Arboretum that was leveled by the tornado, to identifying areas for reforestation, areas for studying what happens naturally from this wind injury, to all the landscape replanting plans and in many cases, newly realized opportunities. Great creativity and enthusiasm here.

3. The i-Tree data collection to the trees will continue tomorrow morning, moving into the Arboretum for the next three days, and I wish you could be here. In addition to collecting data for a crucial piece of the story of Secrest and the story of what happened on September 16, all involved felt it is a truly meaningful way of honoring, mourning, relating to these trees. Rather than just saying we lost x number of trees, we are speaking to these trees one last time. As I said, We wish you could be here, but there is an issue. At this time, it does not look like the OARDC campus will open until Wednesday. There is a lot of heavy equipment involved in the cleanup and the police and Highway Patrol are getting ever-more serious about safety and security. A few of us are now grandfathered in relative to doing the inventory and by using the magic words of "Ken Cochran" and are in the Highway Patrol database for officers new on the scene. Will update you as the campus becomes more open.

4. One of the ways we will find to get more information out will be in this Thursday' s edition of BYGL (bygl.osu.edu) and a link then to some pictures that will be used on the conference Webex on Tuesday morning. Also this changes things somewhat relative to the October 20 Why Trees Matter Forum. We are not going to miss the great talks from Dave Nowak of the Forest Service (a key i-Tree architect) or of Dan Herms research and others, but by then we will have a pretty coherent story of the environmental benefits of the trees lost at Secrest and a way to help tell our stories of what the trees mean to many of us as well.

5. There is meaning on so many levels here. The meaning of Steve Slack and Bobby Moser touring OARDC and the Arboretum day after day, and the meaning of Chuck Krause of USDA alone as we came upon him looking at the wreckage of his world-class lab in the Ag Engineering Building this afternoon. Think of them all, the heartbreak and the joy, of Ken Cochran moving along his grieving curve to one of renewal and a sense of "think of what we will do next"!
Comment by Mark Webber on September 20, 2010 at 9:49am
Saturday Notes

As you probably know, only one minor physical injury with the Wooster tornado. The devastation at Secrest is extensive, but tremendous spirit of renewal developing there and at OARDC where loss of buildings, greenhouse, research and unique germplasm lost. As one my wife Laura' s 2nd grade students wrote to accompany their sympathy drawings: "Ken, I am sorry for loosing (sp) your trees on the ground and your data". Cleanup efforts monumental with Ken and Joe and Karcher and Roger and Arboretum interns Paul and Tim and so many others. Incredible loss of trees, but one thing Bruce Cubberley and I and other WTMatterites have started is an inventory (GPS, species, size) of OARDC campus and Secrest trees that were lost - with an ecological audit of this loss it will help tell the story of respect we have for these trees. I will send and eventually post some pictures. Here are a few notes:

1. Someone we know just donated $30,000 to rebuilding fund for the Arboretum.
2. President Gee, Governor Strickland, Bobby Moser and Steve Slack (many times) have visited and have been very supportive. Keith Smith has sent concerns and thoughts. Vice-Provost Mike Boehm is at the center of One University efforts to coordinate the response.
3. Federal Disaster designation has been approved.
4. Springtime planting memorial planned with Secrest and NYC (they had major tornado at pretty much the same time Thursday).
5. Some major losses:

Rhododendron valley quite a wreck with hundreds of large trees with no tops
Umbrella magnolia grove flattened
New outreach building which we just started to use is no more - completely gone except floor
Huge oaks behind Stone House uprooted
White pine archway one-sided now
Hemlock rill up toward dawnredwoods with hundreds of trees down
Crablandia I gone
Crabapples along road: 2/3 are gone
London planetrees in Fisher parking lot gone
Major loss of greenhouses and research, Ag Engineering building will probably all come down, damage to Admin building
Number of barns gone
Loss of trees: possibly a thousand.

6. On the other hand:

Only one minor injury
Much of campus undamaged, including all of ATI
2/3 of Arboretum relatively unaffected
Dawnredwood grove intact
Crablandia II (our new research plot) with only a half dozen trees down
New phenology pavilion virtually unscathed
Most of old Shade Tree plot unaffected
Incredible number of people, businesses and organization are supporting the Arboretum and OARDC in many many ways
Ken Cochran, hurt beyond measure, is providing uplifting effort and is working this into his mission and moving forward very positively and with great spirit

In addition to the i-Tree ecological audit of the trees lost, as time and all our awareness develops of what is gone it will be great to pull together reminiscences and tree-stories of trees and treetopias (tree-places) i the Arboretum as part of the permanent record. So, a few opportunities:

1. If the campus opens and you want to come up and be part of the lost tree inventory that continues on M-W give me a buzz.
2. The Extension Nursery Landscape and Turf Team Invasive Species Tour to Massachusetts that Amy Stone had developed for October 10-12 is cancelled and those who can make it are invited to Secrest for some work and ceremony and inservicing days, followed by our Team meeting on Weds, October 13. More later.

Will post photos soon.

Sunday Secrest Message

Friends: Here are a few updates this Sunday.

1. Bruce Cubberley, Cathy Herms, Laura Chatfield and Jim Chatfield have completed the data collection from the OARDC campus trees greater than 3 inches in diameter that were lost to the tornado. We did these campus trees first because more of these are now stumps due to the magnificent cleanup effort underway. Almost 200 trees, almost all over 10" in diameter. Some examples you will recognize are a 42" pin oak near Madison Avenue just north of the Admin

Members

Best Choice in Roofing and Siding Repairs!

Southwest Ohio's Best Choice

Birthdays

Landscape Design Kit

Do you need a professional landscape design in your yard? 

Click below

landscapedesignkit%20%281%29.pdf to down load your landscape design kit!

 

Mark Webber can help you Stop EAB NOW......call 937.835.3381 or email him at mwebber@webberlandscaping.com

Adult Beetle

"D" Shaped Exit Holes

Mark Webber's Landscaping Company Team can save your ASH!


Higher Standard of Landscape can be found at

Click for the BBB Business Review of this Landscape Contractors in Dayton OH

DON'T GUESS SOIL TEST

Do you know how much to fertilize your lawn and landscaping?   Expert soil testing and evaluation services at 937.835.3381 or connect "live chat" 

Forum

What Plant AM I?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title May 20. 0 Replies

What Plant AM ?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title Apr 29. 0 Replies

Plant Identification

Started by Chris Hildreth in Sample Title Apr 25. 0 Replies

What Plant AM I?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title Apr 15. 0 Replies

What Plant AM I?

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title Apr 1. 0 Replies

What Plant AM I for March 18th of 2017

Started by Mark Webber in Sample Title. Last reply by Joe Camlin Mar 19. 1 Reply

Great Gardens Begin With Great Planning!

 



Call us for yours today  937.835.3381

About

Mark Webber created this Ning Network.

© 2017   Created by Mark Webber.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Offline

Live Video